The Star and Flame

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The Star and Flame of Epoli come with a story most dear and revered amongst those who remember it. In the simplest terms, the Star and Flame represent the same thing: Light, or lighting the way. The way, of course being a metaphor for Epoli itself, but also their idealism, and unique method by which they won the hearts and minds of Eem and her Middle Kingdoms.

The Star and Flame however are not the same, and the selection of their images is tied to the earliest stories of Eem’s discovery. The story has many versions, but each involve the falling of a star towards the western coast of a new world, a world which would be referred to as Eem (the name’s meaning itself being ‘light’, or more specifically the eem of an ember; the glow of an ember’s light). Eem’s fallen star, the Star of Epoli represents both the fallen star or legend, as well as all of the stars that burn in the heavens. Stars hold great metaphorical meaning for many folk in Eem, for despite the darkness of the night sky, stars burn brilliantly and seemingly forever. And should one fall to the earth, the embers spark a fire, or the Flame of Epoli.

The Flame of Epoli represents the burning light cast off by the Star’s embers. A fire that can be carried or sparked again by any mortal hands. Fire horns and flints can cast off the night and bring light to dark places. So where the Star represents the enlightenment that is always with us, the Flame represents our duty to carry that light within ourselves and to the world beyond.

The story of the Star and Flame has other interpretations as well. For instance, in Felmog the symbol of Epoli’s star is represented by an Iron Sun and was adopted as the namesake of the Order of the Iron Sun of Maax. Ancestors of modern Maax witnessed the carving of their valley by a falling meteor. To them, it was a devastating calamity that also brought with it a gift. The fragments of that fallen star bore with it their most sacred material: starfell steel. To this day, though rare the ruling class of Maax and other Felmog Orders trade and craft objects of great value with the last remaining bits of starfell steel.

In the seaside city of Kreeth, the Flame was adopted by the Order of the Black Candle, and is interpreted by reverence for the light of a single candle. In Kreeth, the Black Candle is the ultimate symbol for fealty, and is represented widely by oaths taken to swear their fleeting lives to The Quest. Just as a candle can only burn so long, so do the lives of Knights committed to the hardships of a Quest.